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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get Biosecurity Tasmania Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


180 advisories found for Seeds.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 09/2024 - Seasonal Biosecurity Compliance Reports

​Biosecurity Tasmania has commenced publishing seasonal compliance activities undertaken by Authorised Officers, in accordance with several pieces of legislation covering Tasmania's biosecurity system.

The Seasonal Compliance Reporting provides a summary of key compliance actions undertaken by Biosecurity Tasmania based on the Compliance and Enforcement Framework.  There are numerous other compliance activities undertaken including education and support activities to encourage voluntary compliance, responses to complaints and a range of other audits and inspections which are not captured in these reports.

Areas covered by biosecurity legislation include plant biosecurity, animal biosecurity and welfare, invasive species (including cat management) and product integrity (including food safety, agricultural and veterinary chemical use and traceability).

Biosecurity Tasmania applies a graduated and proportionate approach to the application of compliance and enforcement actions, that include:

  • Educational outcomes
  • Cautionary outcomes
  • Application of sanctions such as suspension or cancellation of permits or approvals
  • Biosecurity Detection Notices (BDNs)
  • Prescribed Infringement Notices (PIN)
  • Prosecutions

Several factors are considered when determining the appropriate response ranging from the nature, impact, intent and severity of the allegation to evidence of criminality for more serious offences. This ensures the most proportionate and consistent compliance or enforcement response is taken in any incident.

The recently published Spring 2023 compliance reporting can be viewed on the Biosecurity Tasmania website at www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/bios​ecurity/seasonal-biosecurity-compliance-report.

The reports will be published quarterly and will be made available on this webpage.​

(26/2/2024)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 08/2024 – Declaration of non-sterile Digitalis species (foxgloves)

​The Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania intends to list all sexually reproductive species, sub-species, varieties, hybrids and cultivars of Digitalis species (commonly known as foxgloves). 

The Declaration seeks to prevent sale and trade of all foxgloves to prevent further spread within Tasmania and prevent the introduction of new Digitalis species. The proposed declaration is limited to “designated areas” around State Reserves and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area and does not affect those with existing foxglove species in gardens outside designated areas.

The Declaration does not include sterile varieties of Digitalis

Common foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) is the only naturalised foxglove listed in the Census of the Vascular Plants of Tasmania. The plant is widely grown as a garden ornamental across Tasmania and has become a widespread environmental weed. It is a threat to high conservation values such as Tasmania’s national parks and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. 

Foxglove is also toxic to humans and animals. All parts of the foxglove plant, especially the leaves, are poisonous.

Eradication of common foxglove from all parts of the State is not feasible and its common occurrence as a garden plant would make this difficult. 

This declaration aims to strike a balance between protecting important environmental values and agricultural assets, whilst at the same time not diverting resources away from high priority weed species for which eradication is still the target. 

Declaration is limited to “designated areas” (areas buffering State Reserves and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area) and “designated purposes” (including specific requirements to control foxglove, in order to protect vulnerable industries or the natural environment, outside designated areas).

Copies of the Statement of Intent will be available on the NRE Tas website Have Your Say - Public Comments Invited | Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania (nre.tas.gov.au)​ and submissions are invited for a period of 60 days and should be received by 5:00pm 21 April 2024. 

For more information visit https://nre.tas.gov.au/invasive-species/weeds/proposed-declaration-of-digitalis-species-(foxgloves)​ or call (03) 6165 3777. 

(21/2/2024)
Categories: Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Plant pests; Cropping; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Pasture;


Biosecurity Advisory 49/2023 - Biosecurity Basics help protect Tasmania

With the arrival of summer, Biosecurity Tasmania is urging visitors, and all Tasmanians, to be extra vigilant for potential biosecurity risks they may bring with them on the journey to Tasmania and to remember the Biosecurity BasicsCome in Clean, Check your Bags, Stay on the Path, and Report anything Unusual! 

A forgotten piece of fruit in your luggage, mud caked on vehicles and equipment, clothing or footwear and recreational equipment that has not been checked and cleaned, can potentially have a serious impact on Tasmania’s primary industries, environment, and our way of life.

The Biosecurity Basics are simple, yet practical actions we can ALL take to help protect Tasmania from the negative impacts of pests, weeds and diseases. 

Check your Bags is an important Biosecurity Basic action. You may not even realise that you are bringing a biosecurity restricted item into the state when you visit or return home. Take a few extra minutes when preparing to travel to Tasmania to ensure you are not bringing fruit and vegetables, some animal and seafood products as well as plants, soil and seeds. 

Many pests can hitchhike their way into Tasmania inside an item in your luggage. For example, the larvae of the tiny but dangerous fruit fly may be lurking in an uneaten apple. Dispose of these items or declare them on arrival. Your actions can help Tasmania remain fruit fly free.

The same applies to buying items online or receiving gifts from friends and family overseas. Be sure to Check your Parcels if ordering goods online. Also let your family and friends know about what they can and can’t send to you in Tasmania​.

Come in Clean is another simple Biosecurity Basic that can help prevent the introduction and spread of harmful pests and diseases.  Mud on your vehicle, caravan or trailer could contain harmful weed seeds or other pathogens. Just as a single drop of water left inside the waders you used while angling in New Zealand could contain didymo. Also known as “rock snot”, didymo is a freshwater algae found in many rivers and streams in NZ and has caused serious damage to our neighbours’ river ecosystems, fish and the pleasures of fly fishing.

If you have visited rural areas or been around farm animals in Indonesia/Bali, you may have come in contact with soil or other organic matter that could contain the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Cleaning your clothing, footwear and any gear (or even leaving some items behind) before you return to Australia is vital to ensuring that our country remains free from this serious animal disease.  

We all have role to play in helping to keep Tasmania free from the many biosecurity threats that are present in other Australian states and territories, and across the globe. We all have a general biosecurity duty​​ to take the necessary actions to protect Tasmania’s biosecurity – in fact, it’s the law!

Get to know ALL the Biosecurity Basics - visit the webpages today to find out more about how you can help protect Tasmania: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity-basics 

You can also view the Biosecurity Basics video series on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_LeRPTlTNWiPWKlbJdaubnfNVHh4xYri​

(19/12/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 47/2023 - 2023 Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards winners announced

​On Wednesday 6 December, Hon Jo Palmer MLC, Minister for Primary Industries and Water announced the winners of the inaugural Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards.

The Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards were developed to honour individuals within industries and communities that have made a significant contribution to the state's biosecurity. There are two categories for the awards, the Tasmanian Community Biosecurity Award and the Tasmanian Industry Biosecurity Award.

Robyn Lewis was the winner of the Tasmanian Community Biosecurity Award for her significant involvement in the management and conservation of the Milford Forest. Robyn has been involved in the management and conservation of the Milford Forest for many years, and has successfully implemented very strong biosecurity measures on the property.

Nic Hansen was the winner of the Tasmanian Industry Biosecurity Award for his avid support of the development and improvement of biosecurity in Tasmania. Nic Hansen has worked closely with Horticulture Australia and the National Fruit Fly Council on biosecurity matters and regulation as well as being involved in the 2018 fruit fly emergency response in Tasmania. 

Other nominees of the awards included forensic biologist and beekeeper Charles Connor, Just Cats Inc. a community-oriented organisation supporting cat and kitten welfare, Bill Oosting who has been in the Tasmanian beekeeping community for over 50 years and Michael Rocca who provides significant support to the Northwest Beekeeping Association while also managing his own apiary.

You can read more about the inaugural Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards and our 2023 award winners at www.nre.tas.gov.au/tasbiosecurityawards

(8/12/2023)
Categories: Gene technology; Cropping; Freshwater pests; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 43/2023 - Tasmanian Biosecurity Strategy 2023-2027

​​​Biosecurity Tasmania is excited to announce the release of the Tasmanian Biosecurity Strategy 2023-2027. The strategy has been developed following a round of public consultation in late-2022, with the review process guided by the Biosecurity Advisory Council (as appointed under the Biosecurity Act 2019).

The Tasmanian Biosecurity Strategy is the high-level document that sets the overall direction for biosecurity management in Tasmania by Government, industry and the community. The strategy will help to support a robust and effective Tasmanian biosecurity system where everybody understands, supports, and actions sound biosecurity practices to protect their communities, the environment, and the economy from unwanted pests and diseases.

You can find more information and view the Tasmanian Biosecurity Strategy 2023-2027 at www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-strategy.

(10/11/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 40/2023 – Wildlife importation submissions for public comment

​The Environment business unit of the Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania (NRE Tas) has received submissions for the importation of two new species into Tasmania. These species are the Sri Lankan Leopard, Panthera pardus kotiy and the White-bellied caique, Pioites leucogaster.

A risk assessment for each species has been undertaken by NRE Tas, and public comment is invited before 20 October 2023.

Details of the species profiles and risk assessments is available for viewing on the NRE Tas website​.​

(18/10/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 38/2023 - New South Wales entering transition to management for varroa mite

​​​The National Management Group (NMG) confirmed on 19 September 2023 that eradication of Varroa destructor (varroa mite) in New South Wales (NSW) is no longer feasible based on technical grounds. As a result, NSW will begin a transition to management phase for varroa mite.

Tasmania continues to remain free of varroa mite. 

Since the start of the NSW response, Biosecurity Tasmania has maintained an extensive surveillance system aimed at reducing the risk of varroa mite entering Tasmania and to provide early detection of exotic pests. This includes restrictions on the import of bees, apiary products and used apiary equipment, significant border inspection and surveillance activity including increased surveillance of vessels from NSW, increased general port surveillance for bee swarms, and increased passenger awareness. These actions have been maintained throughout the response in NSW and will continue to be maintained into the future. 

Risk assessments for varroa mite are ongoing due to the evolving situation in NSW to ensure varroa entry risks are effectively managed. 

Tasmanian beekeepers are encouraged to remain vigilant by closely monitoring their colonies for symptoms and signs of varroa mite. 

It is also vital that every beekeeper across Tasmania is registered, as registration is one of our most powerful tools to protect against pests and diseases that threaten our bee population. 

Registration is compulsory and is free of charge. For more information or to register, visit www.nre.tas.gov.au/beekeeper-registration

You can find more information on varroa mite including the online hive surveillance reporting form at www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/bees/varroa-mite or on the NSW webpage at www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/emergencies/biosecurity/current-situation/varroa-mite-emergency-response

(20/9/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 37/2023 - Small hive beetle restrictions easing while inspections continue

With no more small hive beetles found since the resumption of hive inspections in the current east Devonport Bee Movement Restriction Area (BMRA), Biosecurity Tasmania is implementing a staged process to ease restrictions. 

Thanks to the success of the response to date, effective from Tuesday 19 September the BMRA will be reduced from a radius of 10km to 5km from the original detection site.  View the 5km BMRA on the Bee Movement Restriction Area interactive map 

Movement restrictions remain in place for beekeepers within the 5km BMRA and Biosecurity Tasmania will continue inspections and trapping activities. 
 
If you are in the 5km BMRA and need to open beehives for animal welfare reasons, or you are a pollinator wanting to move hives into the BMRA for crop pollination, please call Biosecurity Tasmania on 6165 3777.  
 
If you are in the 5km – 10km area, restrictions no longer apply, meaning beehives can be opened and moved.  Please contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 6165 3777 to arrange for protective tape and traps to be removed from your hives.  
 
Biosecurity Tasmania acknowledges the exceptional level of cooperation from beekeepers, industry and the community during this emergency response.  
 
It is vital that every beekeeper across the state is registered as registration is one of our most powerful tools to protect against pests and diseases that threaten our bee population. Registration is free and compulsory. For more information or to register, visit www.nre.tas.gov.au/beekeeper-registration
  
For more information on small hive beetle, please visit www.nre.tas.gov.au/SHB or call 6165 3777. ​


(18/9/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 34/2023 - Biosecurity Tasmania resumes hive inspections as pollination season begins

Biosecurity Tasmania continues to work closely with the Tasmanian Beekeepers Association and Fruit Growers Tasmania and is communicating directly with beekeepers to ensure pollination of orchards in the greater Devonport area can continue with minimal interference and minimal risk.

As part of the ongoing small hive beetle response, the current 10km Bee Movement Restriction Area will remain in place until further notice – an interactive map can be seen here: Bee Movement Restriction Area interactive map

Biosecurity Tasmania officers have resumed hive inspections in the Devonport area after they were temporarily ceased over winter to ensure bee welfare was maintained. Weather permitting, it is estimated that all existing hives in the Bee Movement Restriction Area and incoming hives for crop pollination, will be checked by the end of October. Provided no further beetles are detected, Biosecurity Tasmania aims to reduce the size of the Area as soon as possible. 

Hives cannot enter the Bee Movement Restriction Area without a permit – penalties may apply.

Pollinators can apply for a permit to bring their hives into the 10km Bee Movement Restriction Area specifically for the purpose of pollinating crops at no cost. Only one permit is required per pollinator, regardless of the number of hives. To apply for a permit, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777. 

All hives will be inspected (when the ambient temperature allows) for small hive beetle while inside the Bee Movement Restriction Area and checked again before they leave. Permits allow hives to be brought into the Bee Movement Restriction Area and placed at orchards prior to inspection. 

Small hive beetle has the potential to significantly damage beehives, destroy honey and endanger bees. Biosecurity Tasmania’s emergency management protocols have been enacted to contain, manage and recover as quickly and efficiently as possible. Biosecurity Tasmania encourages all beekeepers to visit the Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania’s website for more information https://nre.tas.gov.au/SHB



(1/9/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 33/2023 - Update to terminology - Small Weight Seed Imports - Import Requirement 36 (IR36) - Seeds for Sowing

​With the implementation of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania 2023 (PBMT) – Version 2 the terminology surrounding small weight seed imports has changed. This change does not impact trade for those currently supplying and importing small weight seed lots of 1kg or less under Import Requirement 36 I(b).

As part of changes under the Biosecurity Act 2019 (BA2019), the program can no longer be classed as a ‘register’. Therefore, the terminology has been updated to the following: 

Tasmanian Approved Seed Importer (TASI) formally Tasmanian Register of Seed Importers (TRSI)

Tasmanian Approved Seed Supplier (TASS) formally Tasmanian Approved Suppliers List (TASL) 

The focus is now on the status under which a business is listed. Importers will be listed as a TASI on the Approved Importers List and Suppliers will be listed as a TASS on the Approved Suppliers List. 

In the coming months, the Notice of Intention (NoI) will be updated to reflect the new terminology. Businesses are to continue to use their existing approval number (e.g. TASL-0000 or TRSI-0000) until instructed otherwise. All new TASI and TASS applicants will be issued approval numbers that reflect the updated terminology (e.g. TASS-0000 or TASI-0000). 

Please be aware that there have also been updates to the prohibited seeds, declared weeds and restricted plants lists in Appendix 1.2, 1.2 and 1.4 of the PBMT 2023 – Version 2. It is important that all approved importers and suppliers check these lists regularly to ensure compliance with the relevant Import Requirements. 

For up to date information on the Small Weight Seed Imports , or to apply please visit: Small Weight Seed Imports | Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania (nre.tas.gov.au)

If you have any questions about the update, please contact the Market Access team: biosecurity.marketaccess@nre.tas.gov.au or (03) 6478 4138

(30/8/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;

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