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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get Biosecurity Tasmania Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


192 advisories found for Policy+and+Legislation.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 31/2022 – Public Submissions invited on the Discussion Paper: Towards a 10-Year Salmon Plan

​The Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania invites you to have your say on the Discussion Paper: Towards a 10-Year Salmon Plan.

The Discussion Paper seeks to canvas the views of stakeholders to inform the development of the new 10-Year Salmon Plan. It outlines the strategic policy drivers for the aquaculture sector, including Tasmanian salmon, proposes policy outcomes Government could seek to enable a sustainable, resilient and innovative salmon industry, and presents a range of focus areas for consideration.

 The Discussion Paper forms part of the development of the new 10-Year Salmon Plan.

To view the Discussion Paper, make a submission and join an online feedback session (on 2, 3 and 9 August), visit the NRE Tas website at: www.nre.tas.gov.au/salmonplan

 Submissions close 24 August 2022.

(26/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 30/2022 – Important information about FMD and swill feeding to pigs

​Australia is FMD-free – help us keep it that way!

Swill feeding has been the cause of several exotic disease outbreaks, including the Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) epidemic in the UK in 2001, and is currently playing a major role in spreading African Swine Fever (ASF) within and between countries overseas.

Feeding swill to pigs is illegal in Tasmania and all Australian states and territories.

If you own pigs, you must ensure that you are not feeding them swill. DO NOT accept food donations intended as pig feed from sources including (but not limited to) restaurants, cafes, supermarkets, other food outlets or from your or others’ left-over food that may contain swill.

In Tasmania 'swill' is defined by the Animal Health Act 1995 as any material containing material of placental mammal origin (other than milk and milk by-products, properly rendered meat meal, or tallow).

Swill includes table scraps, meat pies, bacon and cheese rolls, salad with bacon pieces, or untreated used cooking oils or fats. If you cannot be absolutely sure that what you are feeding your pigs isn’t swill – then don’t give it to them! 

The ban on swill-feeding pigs is one of Australia’s strongest defences against the introduction of animal diseases such as FMD and ASF, as these viruses can be carried on food products. Many exotic animal disease viruses are highly resistant to chilling, freezing and curing. Even boiling may not destroy all disease organisms.

If you know of anyone you believe is feeding swill to pigs – please report this to Biosecurity Tasmania: Phone 03 6165 377 or email biosecurity.tasmania@nre.tas.gov.au

More information and useful resources on swill can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/cattle/foot-and-mouth-disease/swill-and-ram-feeding

More information on Foot and Mouth Disease can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/pigs/foot-and-mouth-disease

(21/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 29/2022 – Tasmanian Farmers and Graziers Association (TFGA) Support for Enhanced Biosecurity Project

The Tasmanian Government today announced a grant to the Tasmanian Farmers and Graziers Association (TFGA), who, working in partnership with Biosecurity Tasmania and a range of industry stakeholders, will continue their targeted engagement and support programs to help further strengthen Tasmania’s biosecurity system.

The emergence of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) in Indonesia-Bali, and Lumpy Skin Disease in regions of Indonesia, and varroa mite in NSW, is a timely reminder of the utmost importance of the wider industry putting in place effective on-farm biosecurity plans and practices, as well as the need for the travelling public to make sure we do not bring back unwanted pests and diseases when we return from that region.

The grant of $350 000 over three years will support the TFGA’s ongoing enhanced on-farm biosecurity engagement within the industry (TFGA members and non-members including the supply chain), together with additional measures to further raise community awareness on the importance of good on-farm biosecurity practices.

The grant will fund a Biosecurity Project Officer to educate farmers, the supply chain and the wider community about current and emerging biosecurity issues, emergency response planning and preparedness, practical on-farm risk mitigation strategies, and everyone’s obligations under the Biosecurity Act 2019 and the Act’s General Biosecurity Duty (GBD)

The Project will include the development of a communication plan to focus on communications awareness around Foot and Mouth Disease, Lumpy Skin Disease, Varroa destructor (varroa mite) - as a minimum - and will include delivery in collaboration with other industry stakeholders of project resources and information to the wider agricultural sector and community.  

The plan will also inform how the TFGA will encourage farmers to establish or update biosecurity risk management plans through specific workshops developed as part of this program of broader Tasmanian based programs encompassing risk management planning.

(20/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 28/2022 - REMINDER public submissions on the Draft Animal Welfare Amendment Bill 2022 close at 5pm on 20 July 2022

​A reminder that public submissions on the Draft Animal Welfare Amendment Bill 2022 close at 5pm on 20 July 2022.

​The Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania (NRE Tas) invites public submissions on the Draft Animal Welfare Act Amendment Bill 2022 (the Draft Bill).

The Draft Bill has been developed in close consultation with the Animal Welfare Advisory Committee, NRE Tas and the RSPCA. Key amendments within the Draft Bill seek to support and further strengthen the provisions under the Animal Welfare Act 1993 (the Act) for the enforcement and prosecution of animal welfare offences in Tasmania.

The Draft​ Bill is focussed on eleven important areas in the Act. The key amendment proposals include:

  • expanding the meaning of ‘disposal’ and consequential amendments
  • reversing the onus of proof so that an animal is assumed to belong to the person named as the owner in any animal welfare complaint unless proven otherwise
  • further clarifying Animal Ethics Committee approvals for animal research 
  • providing additional sentencing options for animal cruelty and aggravated cruelty
  • banning the use of pronged collars
  • expanding authorised officer powers of entry
  • expanding authorised officer powers to take possession of animals
  • providing magistrates with the power to order the seizure and immediate disposal of animals at risk
  • reducing the time for which animal carcasses are required to be kept
  • providing for the ability to require information from people who are interstate
  • providing for early cost recovery for care of seized animals.​

Submissions close at 5pm on 20 July 2022.

To view a copy of the Draft Bill, and to access background information to the proposed amendments, including instructions on how to make a submission, please visit the Biosecurity Tasmania website at:​ https://nre.tas.gov.au/awa​

(15/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 27/2022 - Foot and Mouth Disease and Lumpy Skin Disease General Biosecurity Direction

In additional efforts to further reduce the risk of the introduction of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) and Lumpy Skin Disease (LSD), Tasmania’s Chief Veterinary Officer has put in place a General Biosecurity Direction under the Biosecurity Act 2019 to provide an additional layer of protection to Tasmania. The Direction came into effect at 12:00 AM 13 July and remains in effect for six months, unless revoked earlier. 

We all have a role to play in helping to protect Tasmania from the impacts of pests, weeds and diseases. Simple and practical actions you can take when returning to, or visiting Tasmania helps you meet your General Biosecurity Duty.

A reminder that if you are travelling from Indonesia - Bali, ensure that when you return you are not carrying any animal, meat or dairy products.

BEFORE departing for Australia and Tasmania be sure to clean your clothing, shoes and equipment thoroughly - especially if you have been on any farms, have been hiking or visited any markets or zoos, or have been in rural areas of Indonesia - Bali.

Travellers from Indonesia and Bali are asked to present themselves to a Biosecurity Tasmania Officer upon arrival into the state. Officers will be providing advice on some simple and practical measures that can be taken to help those travellers to meet Tasmania’s biosecurity requirements.

The General Biosecurity Direction can be viewed on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/current-biosecurity-alerts 

For more information on travelling to Tasmania from Indonesia and Bali visit:

(14/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 26/2022 - Important information for travellers arriving from Indonesia and Bali

​*REISSUED* - webpage link updated

Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) and Lumpy Skin Disease (LSD)​ have been detected in Indonesia. Recently, FMD was also detected in Bali.​

Australia is currently free of FMD and LSD – with your help we can keep it that way! If the diseases were to establish in Australia or Tasmania, our livestock industries and our continued market access for animal products would be severely impacted.

​If you are travelling to Australia or Tasmania from Indonesia and Bali, please ensure you are not carrying any meat or dairy products.

Clean your clothing, shoes and equipment thoroughly before departing, especially if you have been on any farms, have gone hiking, visited any markets or zoos, or have been in rural areas of Indonesia/Bali.

Please declare these items to biosecurity officers upon your arrival to Australia, and inform our biosecurity officers at your point of arrival in Tasmania if you have recently travelled from Indonesia/Bali.

By taking these actions you will help protect Tasmania and Australia from the introduction and spread of FMD and LSD, as well as other unwanted pests, weeds, and diseases that would impact Tasmania.

To learn more about travelling to Tasmania from Indonesia and Bali visit: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/travellers-guide-to-tasmanian-biosecurity-what-you-can-and-cant-bring-into-tasmania/travelling-to-tasmania-from-indonesia-or-bali

(12/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 25/2022 - Important information for travellers arriving from Indonesia and Bali

Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) and Lumpy Skin Disease (LSD)​ have been detected in Indonesia. Recently, FMD was also detected in Bali.​

Australia is currently free of FMD and LSD – with your help we can keep it that way! If the diseases were to establish in Australia or Tasmania, our livestock industries and our continued market access for animal products would be severely impacted.

If you are travelling to Australia or Tasmania from Indonesia and Bali, please ensure you are not carrying any meat or dairy products.

Clean your clothing, shoes and equipment thoroughly before departing, especially if you have been on any farms, have gone hiking, visited any markets or zoos, or have been in rural areas of Indonesia.

Please declare these items to biosecurity officers upon your arrival to Australia, and inform our biosecurity officers at your point of arrival in Tasmania if you have recently travelled from Indonesia/Bali.

By taking these actions you will help protect Tasmania and Australia from the introduction and spread of FMD and LSD, as well as other unwanted pests, weeds, and diseases that would impact Tasmania.​

To learn more about travelling to Tasmania from Indonesia and Bali visit: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/travellers-guide-to-tasmanian-biosecurity-what-you-can-and-cant-bring-into-tasmania/travelling-to-tasmania-from-indonesia

(12/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 24/2022 - Spanish heath now flowering

​The declared weed Spanish heath (Erica lusitanica) is now in flower and can be seen in many areas across the state. Be on the lookout for this weed. It’s bell-shaped white/pinkish flowers are easily identified, and if found on your property should be managed to prevent further spread.

Often mistaken for native plants, Spanish heath and other declared Erica species are not native to Australia and can be serious weeds in bushland and pasture landscapes. They are hardy perennial plants that can grow quickly (usually up to 1.5 – 2 metres, sometimes up to 3.5 metres), and can even grow in poor, infertile native soils. These plants can produce lots of tiny seeds and can easily spread along roadsides, into bushland, and around farming properties.

Erica plants such as Spanish heath compete with native plants and are a serious threat to bushland communities in Tasmania. They are also an issue for agricultural productivity. As Spanish heath is highly combustible, it poses a significant fire hazard in areas it is found.

The following information sheet provides images and details about Spanish heath and some other Erica species including identifying features, how it spreads and its growth cycle, and options for control: https://www.aabr.org.au/images/stories/resources/ManagementGuides/WeedGuides/wmg_spanish_heath.pdf.

As Spanish heath (and other Erica species) are declared weeds, landholders have a legal requirement to manage Spanish heath. Further information on Spanish heath and Erica species may be found on the NRE Tas Declared Weeds Index webpage: https://nre.tas.gov.au/invasive-species/weeds/weeds-index/declared-weeds-index/erica.​

(8/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 23/2022 - Varroa mite - bee import restrictions - General Biosecurity Direction

​Tasmania’s existing bee-related import restrictions have been extended in light of the current emergency varroa mite response in NSW.  As an additional precautionary measure to further protect Tasmania from the potential introduction of varroa mite, the Tasmanian Chief Plant Protection Officer has now signed a General Biosecurity Direction (Emergency) that puts in place a prohibition on the importation of European honeybees (including queen bees) and various apiary products (including beekeeping equipment) into Tasmania.

This Direction came into effect from 5pm on Wednesday 6 July 2022 and will remain in place for six (6) months, unless it is revoked earlier. The Direction prohibits the import into Tasmania of any:
(a) European honey bee (​Apis mellifera​); or 
(b) any animal product produced by, or from, a European honey bee other than commercially produced bee products such as honey filtered to a maximum 2 mm pore size and melted refined beeswax, or another process approved by the Chief Plant Protection Officer; or
(c) any used beekeeping equipment; or
(d) any other thing that may reasonably be suspected of being a carrier of bees, or any pest or disease that may affect bees.  

​A copy of the General Biosecurity Direction (Emergency) can be found here: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals/animals-that-can-be-imported-with-entry-requirements/bees

Biosecurity Tasmania understands that a potential longer-term restriction on queen bee importation will impact Tasmanian businesses for the upcoming season and Biosecurity Tasmania will work closely with the Tasmanian industry to ensure alternative options are explored.

​If you require further information, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania on (03) 6165 3777 or biosecurity.tasmania@nre.tas.gov.au

If you see anything suspicious in your bee colonies, immediately call the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline 1800 084 881 or call Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email biosecurity.tasmania@nre.tas.gov.au

More information about Varroa mite and the General Biosecurity Direction (Emergency) can be found on our webpage: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/bees/varroa-mite

Further updates on the NSW DPI emergency response can be found on their webpage: https://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/emergencies/biosecurity/current-situation/varroa-mite-emergency-response​

(7/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 22/2022 - Travelling to Tasmania from Indonesia

​Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) and Lumpy Skin Disease (LSD) were detected in Indonesia earlier this year. Australia is currently free of FMD and LSD – with your help we can keep it that way! If the diseases were to establish in Australia or Tasmania, our livestock industries and our continued market access for animal products would be severely impacted.

If you are travelling to Australia or Tasmania from Indonesia, please ensure you are not carrying any meat or dairy products. Clean your clothing, shoes and equipment thoroughly, especially if you have been on any farms or in rural areas of Indonesia. Please declare these items to biosecurity officers upon your arrival to Australia and inform our biosecurity officers at your point of arrival in Tasmania if you have recently travelled from Indonesia.

By taking these actions you will help protect Tasmania and Australia from the introduction of unwanted pests, weeds, and diseases. 

To learn more about travelling to Tasmania from Indonesia, visit: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/travellers-guide-to-tasmanian-biosecurity-what-you-can-and-cant-bring-into-tasmania/travelling-to-tasmania-from-indonesia​ 

​Visit the Biosecurity Tasmania website for more information on Foot and Mouth Disease and Lumpy Skin Disease​.​

(5/7/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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