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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get Biosecurity Tasmania Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


237 advisories found for Plant+diseases.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 09/2024 - Seasonal Biosecurity Compliance Reports

​Biosecurity Tasmania has commenced publishing seasonal compliance activities undertaken by Authorised Officers, in accordance with several pieces of legislation covering Tasmania's biosecurity system.

The Seasonal Compliance Reporting provides a summary of key compliance actions undertaken by Biosecurity Tasmania based on the Compliance and Enforcement Framework.  There are numerous other compliance activities undertaken including education and support activities to encourage voluntary compliance, responses to complaints and a range of other audits and inspections which are not captured in these reports.

Areas covered by biosecurity legislation include plant biosecurity, animal biosecurity and welfare, invasive species (including cat management) and product integrity (including food safety, agricultural and veterinary chemical use and traceability).

Biosecurity Tasmania applies a graduated and proportionate approach to the application of compliance and enforcement actions, that include:

  • Educational outcomes
  • Cautionary outcomes
  • Application of sanctions such as suspension or cancellation of permits or approvals
  • Biosecurity Detection Notices (BDNs)
  • Prescribed Infringement Notices (PIN)
  • Prosecutions

Several factors are considered when determining the appropriate response ranging from the nature, impact, intent and severity of the allegation to evidence of criminality for more serious offences. This ensures the most proportionate and consistent compliance or enforcement response is taken in any incident.

The recently published Spring 2023 compliance reporting can be viewed on the Biosecurity Tasmania website at www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/bios​ecurity/seasonal-biosecurity-compliance-report.

The reports will be published quarterly and will be made available on this webpage.​

(26/2/2024)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 05/24 - Tasmania is fruit fly free, help us keep it that way!

​Spring and summer are the peak seasons for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia, meaning it is also a time of increased risk for Tasmania.  That's why Biosecurity Tasmania is asking all Tasmanians to be on the lookout for anything unusual they may find in fruit.

Biosecurity Tasmania has strict import requirements and ongoing statewide surveillance in place, all aimed at reducing the risk of fruit fly getting into Tasmania.

Tell-tale signs of fruit fly to look out for include live larvae or eggs in the flesh of fruit or small puncture marks on the skin of fruit.  Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could be found in fruit that you have purchased, or from fruit grown in your backyard.  

Fruit flies lay eggs in a wide range of fruits and fruiting vegetables.

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility. Biosecurity Tasmania works closely with mainland states to help manage fruit fly risks and over the spring and summer months there are increased inspections of imported fruit fly host produce at the Tasmanian border. However, while the risk to Tasmania can be lowered it can unfortunately never be reduced to zero. This is why it's takes all of us, industry, government and the community, to keep Tasmanian fruit fly free. We all need to remain vigilant and work together to help protect Tasmania.

Anyone who notices any larvae in fruit is asked to put the fruit in a sealed bag or container and place it in the refrigerator and contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777. Please DO NOT dispose of any fruit that has larvae in it.

More information on fruit fly is at www.nre.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(2/2/2024)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 04/2024 - Upcoming Tree Biosecurity Workshops

​The Tasmanian Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania and Plant Health Australia will be conducting free tree biosecurity workshops in February 2024.

The purpose of the workshops is to raise awareness and enable the early detection of exotic pests that pose significant biosecurity risks to trees in our urban, natural, and commercial environments.

Two workshops will be held in the North and South of the state:

Hobart - 20 February 2024 10.00am-3.00pm

Launceston - 21 February 10.00am-3.00pm

These workshops will be of particular interest to those working in the field with trees, those already undertaking tree health assessments and/or plant pest trapping and treatments, and those who are interested in collecting records and data on tree health in relation to their area of work. The focus will be on biosecurity pests of concern. 

The workshop will cover:

  • The importance of biosecurity
  • Signs and symptoms– what do we mean by dieback, cankers or frass and what do they look like?
  • Information about key pest threats - What do they look like? What should you look for?
  • Introduction to MyPestGuide™ Trees and MyPestGuide™ Reporter App
  • How to report suspect exotic pests

If you would like to participate in the workshop, please RSVP by completing the following form:

https://forms.office.com/r/SxtpW5qHrJ

RSVPs are due by 9 February 2024.

If this workshop might be of value to others in your workplace/area of work, please forward this invitation. 

If you have further enquiries, please contact us.

Veronica Hayes - Surveillance Coordinator (Plant Biosecurity)
0448 366 101 or veronica.hayes@nre.tas.gov.au

Rohan Burgess – (Surveillance Manager)

(02) 6215 7700  or RBurgess@phau.com.au


(25/1/2024)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests;


Biosecurity Advisory- 01/2024- Emergency General Biosecurity Direction for European honey bees and associated products- renewal January 2024

​Due to the current situation of varroa mite (Varroa destructor) in New South Wales (NSW), the Tasmanian Chief Plant Protection Officer has put in place an extension to the general biosecurity direction (emergency), to prevent the introduction of this honey bee parasite into Tasmania.

This direction takes effect as of 12am on Sunday 7 January 2024 and remains in effect for six (6) months, unless it is revoked earlier. The direction prohibits the import into Tasmania of any:
  • European honey bee (Apis mellifera); or
  • any animal product produced by, or from, a European honey bee other than commercially produced bee products such as honey filtered to a maximum 2 mm pore size and melted refined beeswax, or another process approved by the Chief Plant Protection Officer; or
  • any used beekeeping equipment; or
  • any other thing that may reasonably be suspected of being a carrier of bees, or any pest or disease that may affect bees.
This extension has been put in place as NSW transitions their varroa mite response from eradication to management. Once completed, ongoing risk analysis work being conducted at both the national and state levels will inform future imports of bees, bee products and beekeeping equipment into Tasmania. While this general biosecurity direction (emergency) remains in place, producers will need to continue sourcing queen bees from within Tasmania.

A copy of the general biosecurity direction (emergency) is available on this webpage: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals/bees

More information about varroa mite can be found on the NRE Tas website: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/bees/varroa-mite​​​


(5/1/2024)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 49/2023 - Biosecurity Basics help protect Tasmania

With the arrival of summer, Biosecurity Tasmania is urging visitors, and all Tasmanians, to be extra vigilant for potential biosecurity risks they may bring with them on the journey to Tasmania and to remember the Biosecurity BasicsCome in Clean, Check your Bags, Stay on the Path, and Report anything Unusual! 

A forgotten piece of fruit in your luggage, mud caked on vehicles and equipment, clothing or footwear and recreational equipment that has not been checked and cleaned, can potentially have a serious impact on Tasmania’s primary industries, environment, and our way of life.

The Biosecurity Basics are simple, yet practical actions we can ALL take to help protect Tasmania from the negative impacts of pests, weeds and diseases. 

Check your Bags is an important Biosecurity Basic action. You may not even realise that you are bringing a biosecurity restricted item into the state when you visit or return home. Take a few extra minutes when preparing to travel to Tasmania to ensure you are not bringing fruit and vegetables, some animal and seafood products as well as plants, soil and seeds. 

Many pests can hitchhike their way into Tasmania inside an item in your luggage. For example, the larvae of the tiny but dangerous fruit fly may be lurking in an uneaten apple. Dispose of these items or declare them on arrival. Your actions can help Tasmania remain fruit fly free.

The same applies to buying items online or receiving gifts from friends and family overseas. Be sure to Check your Parcels if ordering goods online. Also let your family and friends know about what they can and can’t send to you in Tasmania​.

Come in Clean is another simple Biosecurity Basic that can help prevent the introduction and spread of harmful pests and diseases.  Mud on your vehicle, caravan or trailer could contain harmful weed seeds or other pathogens. Just as a single drop of water left inside the waders you used while angling in New Zealand could contain didymo. Also known as “rock snot”, didymo is a freshwater algae found in many rivers and streams in NZ and has caused serious damage to our neighbours’ river ecosystems, fish and the pleasures of fly fishing.

If you have visited rural areas or been around farm animals in Indonesia/Bali, you may have come in contact with soil or other organic matter that could contain the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Cleaning your clothing, footwear and any gear (or even leaving some items behind) before you return to Australia is vital to ensuring that our country remains free from this serious animal disease.  

We all have role to play in helping to keep Tasmania free from the many biosecurity threats that are present in other Australian states and territories, and across the globe. We all have a general biosecurity duty​​ to take the necessary actions to protect Tasmania’s biosecurity – in fact, it’s the law!

Get to know ALL the Biosecurity Basics - visit the webpages today to find out more about how you can help protect Tasmania: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity-basics 

You can also view the Biosecurity Basics video series on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_LeRPTlTNWiPWKlbJdaubnfNVHh4xYri​

(19/12/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 48/2023 - Permit applications for the small hive beetle response during the holiday period

​A reminder for all beekeepers that movement restrictions remain in place within the 1.5km East Devonport Bee Movement Restriction Area (BMRA) as part of the ongoing small hive beetle response. Beekeepers must not move bees, beehives, captured swarms, nucleus colonies, or used beekeeping equipment in, out or within the BMRA.  

 
Although beekeepers within the BMRA can now open their hives for management and the collection of honey, honeycomb or wax, permits are still required for the following activities.

Movement of bees, captured swarms or nucleus colonies in, out or within the BMRA.  
Movement of beehives or used beekeeping equipment in, out or within the BMRA.
The capture of swarms within the BMRA

Please note that while the small hive beetle response will continue over the holiday period, the response will have reduced staff capacity between 22 December 2023 and 2 January 2024. This may result in a delay in processing of permit applications received during this time. Please keep this in mind and contact Biosecurity Tasmania on (03) 6165 3777 as soon as possible if you need to apply for a permit during this period.

Please find attached the most recent small hive beetle information sheet for beekeepers. For more information on small hive beetle, please visit www.nre.tas.gov.au/SHB​ or call 6165 3777. ​

Biosecurity Tasmania sincerely thanks the beekeeping community for their support during the ongoing small hive beetle response and wishes you all a very happy holiday season.


​​​​​


(11/12/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Timber imports; Wildlife;
Attachment: SHB Info sheet_29 November 2023.pdf


Biosecurity Advisory 47/2023 - 2023 Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards winners announced

​On Wednesday 6 December, Hon Jo Palmer MLC, Minister for Primary Industries and Water announced the winners of the inaugural Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards.

The Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards were developed to honour individuals within industries and communities that have made a significant contribution to the state's biosecurity. There are two categories for the awards, the Tasmanian Community Biosecurity Award and the Tasmanian Industry Biosecurity Award.

Robyn Lewis was the winner of the Tasmanian Community Biosecurity Award for her significant involvement in the management and conservation of the Milford Forest. Robyn has been involved in the management and conservation of the Milford Forest for many years, and has successfully implemented very strong biosecurity measures on the property.

Nic Hansen was the winner of the Tasmanian Industry Biosecurity Award for his avid support of the development and improvement of biosecurity in Tasmania. Nic Hansen has worked closely with Horticulture Australia and the National Fruit Fly Council on biosecurity matters and regulation as well as being involved in the 2018 fruit fly emergency response in Tasmania. 

Other nominees of the awards included forensic biologist and beekeeper Charles Connor, Just Cats Inc. a community-oriented organisation supporting cat and kitten welfare, Bill Oosting who has been in the Tasmanian beekeeping community for over 50 years and Michael Rocca who provides significant support to the Northwest Beekeeping Association while also managing his own apiary.

You can read more about the inaugural Tasmanian Biosecurity Awards and our 2023 award winners at www.nre.tas.gov.au/tasbiosecurityawards

(8/12/2023)
Categories: Gene technology; Cropping; Freshwater pests; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 46/2023 – East Devonport Bee Movement Restriction Area reduced to 1.5km

With no new small hive beetle detections, effective from 12:00pm Wednesday 29 November the East Devonport Bee Movement Restriction Area (BMRA) will be further reduced from a radius of 5km to 1.5km from the original detection site.  View the 1.5km BMRA on the Bee Movement Restriction Area interactive map 

If you are in the 1.5km – 5km area, restrictions no longer apply.  Please contact Biosecurity Tasmania on (03) 6165 3777 to arrange for protective tape and traps to be removed from your hives.

Also effective from Wednesday 29 November, Biosecurity Tasmania is lifting the moratorium on the opening of beehives and the harvest of honey and honeycomb within the BMRA. 

If you are in the 1.5km BMRA you can now open your hives for management and the collection of honey, honeycomb or wax. However, any beekeeping equipment and hive components must be sourced from your property as movement restrictions are still in place. Please contact Biosecurity Tasmania on (03) 6165 3777 to arrange for protective tape to be removed from your hives. Biosecurity Tasmania will be conducting two further inspections, one in January and one in March.

Reminder: Movement restrictions remain in place within the BMRA. Beekeepers must not move bees, beehives, captured swarms, nucleus colonies, honey, honeycomb, wax or used beekeeping equipment in, out or within the BMRA. 

The capture of swarms is supported by Biosecurity Tasmania, however if you are within the BMRA some restrictions apply and you must first obtain a permit. This process will allow Biosecurity Tasmania officers to record the location of the swarm and the intended destination and enable officers to inspect the remaining hive for any traces of small hive beetle.

If you are within the 1.5km BMRA and believe you must move your bees, hives or equipment for any reason, or to apply for a permit for the capture of swarms, please call Biosecurity Tasmania on (03) 6165 3777.

It is vital that every beekeeper across the state is registered as registration is one of our most powerful tools to protect against pests and diseases that threaten our bee population. Registration is free and compulsory. For more information or to register, visit www.nre.tas.gov.au/beekeeper-registration

For more information on small hive beetle and to access an information sheet, please visit www.nre.tas.gov.au/SHB​  or call 6165 3777. 

(29/11/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Pasture; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife; Invasive Species;


Biosecurity Advisory 45/2023 – *RE-ISSUED with updated link - BeeTAS is NOW LIVE!

​Biosecurity Tasmania is thrilled to announce that BeeTAS, a new online beekeeper registration portal, is now LIVE. BeeTAS can be accessed at www.nre.tas.gov.au/beekeeper-registration

Beekeepers can now log into BeeTAS to:    

  • register or renew their registration
  • maintain their apiary site information 
  • record inspection details, record hive purchases, disposals and hive movements
  • upload training certification and laboratory results

If you have registered as a beekeeper in Tasmania since December 2022, your information will be automatically carried across to the BeeTAS online portal. You will be able to log into BeeTAS using the email you provided when you first registered. If you have not re-registered since December 2022, you can now easily do so with BeeTAS!​​

If you require further assistance with registration, have limited online access or have any other BeeTAS queries, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania at honeybee.biosecurity@nre.tas.gov.au​. ​​

(16/11/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 45/2023 – BeeTAS is NOW LIVE!

​Biosecurity Tasmania is thrilled to announce that BeeTAS, a new online beekeeper registration portal, is now LIVE. BeeTAS can be accessed at biosecurityportal.tas.gov.au/​  

Beekeepers can now log into BeeTAS to:    

  • register or renew their registration
  • maintain their apiary site information 
  • record inspection details, record hive purchases, disposals and hive movements
  • upload training certification and laboratory results

If you have registered as a beekeeper in Tasmania since December 2022, your information will be automatically carried across to the BeeTAS online portal. You will be able to log into BeeTAS using the email you provided when you first registered. If you have not re-registered since December 2022, you can now easily do so with BeeTAS!​​

If you require further assistance with registration, have limited online access or have any other BeeTAS queries, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania at honeybee.biosecurity@nre.tas.gov.au​. ​


(16/11/2023)
Categories: Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Cropping; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife;

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