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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get Biosecurity Tasmania Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


258 advisories found for Cropping.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 06/2023 - Weeds Action Fund – Stage 2 Round Three - grant applications now open

​The Weeds Action Fund Stage 2 (Round Three) grant applications are now open.

The Weeds Action Fund is a $5 million Tasmanian State Government initiative that aims to improve the productive value of agricultural land and protect Tasmania's natural values, by removing the harmful effects of priority weeds.

The Fund supports a collaborative approach to preventing weeds from becoming a threat to Tasmania's natural resources. Farmers, community organisations, land managers and other entities can apply to access small grants to build on previous efforts undertaken through the Fund.

The Weeds Action Fund Targeted Small Grants Program follows on from the earlier small and large multi-year grants rounds in 2018-19 (34 projects for a total of $143,658), in 2020 (26 projects valued at $200,000) and in 2021-24 (24 projects valued at $2,403,065 over three years).

Grants are available for new projects that demonstrate collaborative partnerships for coordinated containment or eradication activities, or projects that add value to existing projects by broadening their impact or geographical range.

Applications for Stage Two, Round Three of the Weeds Action Fund close on 5 March 2023. For more information visit: https://nrmnorth.org.au/land/weeds-action-fund/​

This project is funded by the Tasmanian Government through the Tasmanian Weeds Action Fund facilitated by NRM North with support from NRM South and the Cradle Coast Authority NRM.​

(1/2/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 05/2023 - Tasmania is fruit fly free - please help us keep it that way!

​​​Tasmania is fruit fly free – you can help us keep it that way!

If you are travelling to Tasmania, then you have an important role to play in helping to protect the state. You can help protect Tasmania by ensuring that when you visit, you are not carrying or importing restricted items. 

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility, and we all have a General Biosecurity Duty​ to help reduce the biosecurity risk for Tasmania. 

DO NOT BRING fruit and vegetables, seafood and some animal products, plant material, soil and seeds and DISPOSE of these items in the amnesty bins provided at points of entry or DECLARE them to a Biosecurity Tasmania Officer. 

More information on fruit fly is at www.nre.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(1/2/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 04/2023 - Updated Regulations for Transporting Horses to Tasmania

​​​CHANGES to the Animal Welfare (Land Transport of Livestock) Regulations 2013 have been made and are now in effect.

If you are planning on transporting horses over the Bass Strait, then it is essential that you familiarise yourself with the amended regulations which include:

  • The driver of the vehicle used to transport horses is responsible for assessing the fitness of the animals on the vehicle and to ensure compliance with transport welfare regulations to undertake the journey. 
  • The driver of the vehicle must declare in writing that the horses are fit to travel in accordance with the regulations before a vehicle will be allowed to embark onto the ship.
  • Horses must be single stalled in the vehicle unless a mare with dependent foal is being transported.

Additional to the above regulations, horse vehicles (including 2-horse floats) have ventilation opening requirements for the 12-hour Bass Strait crossing which are: 

  • For 2-Horse floats (containing one or two adult horses) there must be secured openings for ventilation in the front and rear of the float, each opening measuring at least 0.4 metres squared.
  • For more than 2 horses in any other vehicle, the ventilation requirement is 0.5 metres squared opening per horse in opposing walls, or an open roof.

TT Line may also have further requirements for horse transportation that you will receive at your time of booking. It is important that you are able to meet these requirements PRIOR to commencing your journey. Failure to do so will result in your vehicle being turned away. 

For more information on transporting horses, please visit Animal Welfare (Land Transport of Livestock) Regulations 2013 and Animal Welfare Guidelines - Land Transport of Livestock. 

(13/1/2023)
Categories: Policy and Legislation; Livestock; Pasture; Cropping; Timber imports; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Marine pests; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 03/2023 – Tasmania is fruit fly free – you can help keep it that way

​​​Biosecurity Tasmania is asking all Tasmanians to be vigilant for anything unusual in fruit, with the spring and summer months being the peak times for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia and a time of increased risk for Tasmania.

Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place to reduce the risk of fruit fly getting into Tasmania, and ongoing statewide surveillance to provide an early warning of a potential incursion however, we are also asking everybody to remain vigilant for, and report any signs of fruit fly.

Tell-tale signs of fruit fly include live larvae or eggs in the flesh of the fruit or small puncture marks on the skin of the fruit. Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could potentially be found in fruit that you purchased, or from fruit grown in your backyard.

Fruit flies lay eggs in a wide range of fruits and fruiting vegetables.

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility. Biosecurity Tasmania works closely with mainland states to help manage the fruit fly risk and there are increased resources and inspections taking place at the border for imported fruit fly host produce, however the risk to Tasmania can never be zero. Therefore industry, government and the community are encouraged to remain vigilant and work together to help protect Tasmania.

Anyone who notices any larvae in fruit is asked to put the fruit in a sealed bag or container and place it in the refrigerator and contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777. Please DO NOT dispose of any fruit that has larvae. More information on fruit fly is at www.nre.tas.gov.au/fruitfly.

(5/1/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 02/2023 - General Biosecurity Direction (Emergency) Extention to bee-related import restrictions

​​Tasmania’s existing bee-related import restrictions have been extended in light of the ongoing emergency varroa mite response in NSW. As an additional precautionary measure to further protect Tasmania from the potential introduction of varroa mite (varroa destructor​), the Tasmanian Chief Plant Protection Officer has extended a General Biosecurity Direction (Emergency) that puts in place a prohibition on the importation of European honeybees (including queen bees) and various apiary products (including used beekeeping equipment) into Tasmania.​

This Direction continues existing requirements, extending these for six months from 5pm on Friday 6 January 2023, unless it is revoked earlier. The Direction prohibits the import into Tasmania of any:
(a) ​​​European honey bee (Apis mellifera); or
(b) any animal product produced by, or from, a European honey bee other than commercially produced bee products such as honey filtered to a maximum 2 mm pore size and melted refined beeswax, or another process approved by the Chief Plant Protection Officer; or
(c) any used beekeeping equipment; or
(d) any other thing that may reasonably be suspected of being a carrier of bees, or any pest or disease that may affect bees. 

Biosecurity Tasmania investigates suspected breaches and non-compliance with Import Requirements and Biosecurity Directions. Heavy penalties apply for non-compliance which may result in monetary penalties or prosecution. A copy of the General Biosecurity Direction (Emergency) can be found at www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals/animals-that-can-be-imported-with-entry-requirements/bees.

Biosecurity Tasmania understands that a potential longer-term restriction on queen bee importation will impact Tasmanian businesses and Biosecurity Tasmania will work closely with the Tasmanian industry to ensure alternative options are explored. If you require further information, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania on (03) 6165 3777 or biosecurity.tasmania@nre.tas.gov.au.

If you see anything suspicious in your bee colonies, immediately call the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline 1800 084 881 or call Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email biosecurity.tasmania@nre.tas.gov.au.

More information about Varroa mite and the General Biosecurity Direction (Emergency) can be found on our webpage at www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/bees/varroa-mite.

Further updates on the NSW DPI emergency response can be found on their webpage at www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/emergencies/biosecurity/current-situation/varroa-mite-emergency-response​.

(4/1/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 01/2023 - Come in clean and help protect Tasmania from foot-and-mouth disease

​​​Australia is currently free of foot-and-mouth disease and lumpy skin disease, and with your help we can keep it that way!

Biosecurity is a shared responsibility, so if you’re going away to, or have family and friends visiting from, an area affected by foot-and-mouth disease, like Indonesia/Bali, it is your responsibility to help protect Tasmania and mainland Australia by knowing and practicing biosecurity basics.

An important Biosecurity Basic​ that will help stop the introduction of diseases like foot-and-mouth disease is COME IN CLEAN. Foot-and-mouth disease can live for extended periods on clothing, shoes and equipment, so it is important travellers clean these items before they travel back to Australia, and then home to Tasmania.

The cleaning of your clothing, shoes, and equipment before departing Indonesia is particularly important if you have been on any farms, have gone hiking or hunting, visited any markets or zoos or have been in any rural areas in Indonesia.

Shoes and boots are potentially primary carriers of disease agents like the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Shake/scrape shoes and boots to remove loose contamination such as soil and manure. You should thoroughly wash soles, laces, velcro and external surfaces using soap/detergent, water and a brush. Dry them well and double check all traces of contamination have been removed. Repeat the procedure if ANY contamination remains visible.

If it is not possible to clean your clothing and equipment before returning – consider leaving those items behind.

On arrival back into Tasmania, remember to present yourself to a Biosecurity Officer and declare that you have travelled from Indonesia/Bali - even if you have been through border security or quarantine on the mainland! Do not enter livestock areas in Tasmania for seven days after returning.

We all have a General Biosecurity Duty to help protect Tasmania from the harmful impacts of pest, weeds and diseases.

Find out more about foot-and-mouth disease on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: www.nre.tas.gov.au/FMD 

The Biosecurity Basics are simple, practical actions and measures that you can take to help protect Tasmania – find out more on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecuritybasics

(3/1/2023)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 53/2022 - Updated Regulations for Transporting Horses to Tasmania

​Requirements for the transport of horses have been advised in the Tasmanian Government Gazette and can be viewed in the Animal Welfare (Land Transport of Livestock) Regulations 2013.

These requirements must be met or horse vehicles will be turned away. Check your ability to meet these requirements before departing from your home property.

The owner and/or driver of the horse transport vehicle is primarily responsible for assessing the fitness of the horses and compliance with transport welfare regulations to undertake the journey and must declare in writing that horses are fit to travel in accordance with the regulations.

You can read more about these regulations and supplementary guidelines online at www.nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals

(23/12/2022)
Categories: Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife; Gene technology; Cropping;


Biosecurity Advisory 52/2022 - Be Biosecurity Safe This Holiday Season

​​​With the holiday season just around the corner, meal preparation may have already started for some families! As happens sometimes, you might end up cooking too much food and have some leftovers from your celebrations! It can be tempting to feed left over food to your pets or livestock, but it is important to understand your General Biosecurity Duty (GBD) before doing so.

When feeding animals, you must be aware that there are restrictions placed on what can or cannot be fed to certain animals. These restrictions help prevent the introduction and spread of serious diseases. Feeding the wrong food to animals can have extreme consequences, particularly if pigs are given prohibited pig feed – which is any food that has meat in it or has been in contact with meat. 

Under Australia’s Ruminant Feed Ban​, ruminants, including cattle or sheep, must not be permitted to access Restricted Animal Material (RAM), which includes any material originating from a mammal, bird or fish.

Feeding prohibited pig feed to pigs is illegal in Tasmania and all Australian states & territories. 

In Tasmania, ‘prohibited pig feed’ is defined in the Biosecurity Regulations 2022 as any animal food or fodder that comprises or has come into contact with meat from a mammal (other than milk or milk by-products from Australia, rendered meat meal or tallow).

The feeding of meat scraps to pigs was one contributing cause for several exotic disease outbreaks, including the FMD outbreaks in the UK in 2001 and the spread of African swine fever throughout Asia in 2020 and 2021.

If you own pigs or know of other pig owners, please ensure that they are not fed anything that contains meat or has been on a plate with meat. People food is not pig food. ​

(15/12/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 51/2022 - Registering your beekeeping activities in Tasmania is now compulsory

​​​Tasmanian beekeepers are invited to register their beekeeping activities before 31 March 2023, using the online form which can be accessed from this webpage: www.nre.tas.gov.au/beekeeper-registration​

Registration is compulsory for all Tasmanian commercial and recreational beekeepers. 

There is no cost to become registered and registration will remain free for the first two years (from 31 March 2023).

There are new conditions associated with registration, meaning any Tasmanian beekeepers currently registered voluntarily with Biosecurity Tasmania will need to re-register using the new online form by 31 March 2023. Until the new registration is received, Biosecurity Tasmania will consider those existing voluntary registrations as meeting the new compulsory requirement. Those beekeepers will be provided with an interim registration certificate.

As part of the implementation of the Biosecurity Act 2019 (the Act), beekeeping is now considered a 'regulated dealing' (under Part 5, Division 3, Section 77). 

Under the Act, a person must not engage in a regulated dealing unless they are 'registered'. 

This requirement has been formalised in new Biosecurity Regulations 2022 which came into effect on 2 November 2022.

Please contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or biosecurity.tasmania@nre.tas.gov.au if you are having trouble accessing or using the online form.​

(14/12/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife; Freshwater pests; Marine pests; Timber imports;


Biosecurity Advisory 50/2022 - Delivering greater protection for animals - Animal Welfare Amendment Bill 2022

Important updates have recently been made to the Animal Welfare Act 1993 (the Act) to improve and strengthen animal welfare outcomes. ​

Developed with the RSPCA and key stakeholders, the Animal Welfare Act Amendment Bill 2022 (the Bill) received Royal assent on 30 November 2022, which now formalises the inclusion of the amendments into the Act. 

The Bill underwent an extensive public consultation process with all feedback considered in the finalisation of the Bill.

Recommended by the Animal Welfare Advisory Committee, the amendments further strengthen the provisions under the Act for the enforcement and prosecution of animal welfare offences in Tasmania, improving welfare for all animals, including pets, livestock and wildlife. 

Key amendments include banning the use of pronged collars, expanding authorised officer powers of entry and to take possession of animals, providing magistrates with the power to order the seizure and immediate disposal of animals at risk and the ability to require information from people who are interstate, simplifying proof of ownership and providing additional sentencing options for animal cruelty and aggravated cruelty. 
 



(12/12/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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