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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get Biosecurity Tasmania Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


334 advisories found.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 49/2022 - Public comment invited on risk assessment for new species import submission

​The Environment business unit of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania (NRE Tas) has received a submission for importing a new species into Tasmania:

  • Bolivian squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis)​
A risk assessment of this species has been undertaken by NRE Tas and public comments are invited – to be received by 20 December 2022.

Details of the species profiles and risk assessments is available for viewing on the NRE website at: Bolivian squirrel monkey | Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania (nre.tas.gov.au)

(7/12/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 48/2022 - Travelling to Tasmania - fruit fly high risk season

​​​If you or your family and friends are travelling to Tasmania, then you have an important role to play in helping to protect the state!

Tasmania has a strict biosecurity system in place to help protect our environment, primary industries, and way of life from the negative impacts of pests, weeds and diseases.

Spring and summer are the highest risk for pests like fruit fly entering Tasmania and although Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place to reduce the risk of these pests getting into Tasmania, everybody has a role to play to protect our environment, primary industries and economy from pests and diseases.

DO NOT BRING fruit and vegetables, seafood and some animal products, plant material, soil and seeds and DISPOSE of these items in the amnesty bins provided at points of entry or DECLARE them to a Biosecurity Tasmania Officer.

More information on fruit fly is at www.nre.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(6/12/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 47/2022 - Public submissions invited on the Draft Tasmanian Salmon Industry Plan

​​​The Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania invites you to have your say on the Draft Tasmanian Salmon Industry Plan.

The Draft Plan establishes a strategic framework to guide Government’s long-term priorities for the salmon aquaculture industry and provides scope for continued response and interactions with industry, supporting and related businesses, and the wider community. 

It includes a separate detailed workplan that will guide implementation priorities over the short, medium and longer term. 

For more information, to make a submission and join a community briefing session, visit: www.nre.tas.gov.au/salmonplan.

Submissions can be made until 20 January 2023. ​

(23/11/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 46/2022 - The Biosecurity Innovation Program 2023-24

​​​Expressions of Interest are now open for the Australian Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) Biosecurity Innovation Program 2023-24.

The Program invests in innovative technologies and approaches to enhance the capacity of our national biosecurity system to manage current and emerging biosecurity challenges and risks. It provides government with opportunities to collaborate with innovators from the business sector, universities, and research entities, to identify technologies and approaches that will contribute to the long-term effectiveness of Australia’s biosecurity system.

Applications close at 11:00pm AEST Friday, 2 December 2022.

For guidance on the application process, including key focus areas and challenges, please visit the Program webpage​.

(17/11/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 45/2022 - Biosecurity Advisory Committee Membership EOI now open

​Expressions of Interest (EOI) are now open to fill five vacancies on the Biosecurity Advisory Committee (BAC). The EOI closes at 9am on Monday, 28 November 2022.​

The BAC provides advice to the Tasmanian Government, the Minister for Primary Industries and Water, and the Secretary of the Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania on biosecurity in Tasmania and helps to guide Government strategies and policy for biosecurity matters. 

The BAC provides advice on the following: 
  • The requirements of a comprehensive and effective biosecurity system for Tasmania, and necessary linkages to other biosecurity systems (national and international);
  • Opportunities to improve industry and community awareness of biosecurity; 
  • Opportunities to improve collaboration in achieving improved biosecurity outcomes including preparedness for biosecurity emergencies; and
  • Any other biosecurity related matter referred to the Committee by the Minister or the Secretary.

Establishing the BAC was one of the key initial tasks required for the effective implementation of Tasmania’s Biosecurity Act 2019.

Committee members are required to prepare for, attend, and participate in a minimum of four meetings a year and may require intrastate travel.

Appointments to the BAC are for a maximum period of three years. Appointments will be staggered from February 2023.

Female candidates are particularly encouraged to apply, in accordance with the Tasmanian Government’s Women on Boards strategy, which aims to improve gender equity and increase female representation on its boards, statutory bodies and committees.

Those interested are asked to provide a copy of their resume, a brief letter outlining which area/s they seek to represent, their relevant expertise, and why they are interested in being appointed and a non-state service candidate conflict of interest disclosure form. 

Candidates seeking more information about the Committee are encouraged to contact Executive Officer for Biosecurity Tasmania Lou Brooke on louise.brooke@nre.tas.gov.au or 0499 619 302. 

Expressions of Interest can be lodged at: EOI Biosecurity Advisory Committee, Biosecurity Tasmania – Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania, GPO Box 44, Hobart TAS 7001, or emailed to: louise.brooke@nre.tas.gov.au​  or 0499 619 302

For more information about the BAC and for a copy of the disclosure form, visit https://nre.tas.gov.au/BAC

EOI closes at 9am on Monday, 28 November 2022.

(8/11/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 44/2022 – Developing compulsory beekeeper registration in Tasmania

As part of the implementation of the Biosecurity Act 2019, beekeeping will soon become a 'regulated dealing' (under Part 5, Division 3, Section 77). 

Under the Act, a person must not engage in a regulated dealing unless they are 'registered'. 

This requirement will be formalised in new Biosecurity Regulations 2022 which came into effect on 2 November 2022, however the beekeeper registration requirement will not be officially launched until later in 2022.

Once the new Regulations are in place, registration of beekeeping activities will become compulsory – for all Tasmanian commercial and recreational beekeepers. 

Preliminary targeted consultation on proposed compulsory registration took place in late 2021, and broader public feedback was sought on the proposed conditions of registration earlier this year.

Biosecurity Tasmania has reviewed the comments received from public consultation and has finalised the conditions of registration that will come into effect later this year.

Beekeepers are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the new conditions before compulsory registration comes into effect.​

To view a copy of the finalised conditions of registration, and for a collated summary of the comments received during public consultation, visit the NRE Tas website: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/bees/beekeeper-registration

(3/11/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 43/2022 - (re-issued) General Biosecurity Regulations 2022

(Re-issued to correct the link to the Beekeeper Registration webpage).

Tasmania’s reputation as a premium producer of agricultural and seafood products, and as a leading tourism destination is reliant on a rigorous and effective biosecurity system.

The landmark Biosecurity Act 2019 (the Act) represented one of the most significant reforms of Tasmania’s primary industry and environmental laws in decades and will replace seven separate and out-dated Acts into a single, modern, ‘fit-for-purpose’ piece of legislation.

The Biosecurity Regulations 2022​ (the Regulations), which come into effect on 2​ November, complete the implementation of the Act and are the last step in ensuring Tasmania has modern biosecurity laws capable of progressing the Tasmanian Biosecurity Strategy. Public consultation on the draft Regulations took place during April and May this year.

The Regulations provide the regulatory framework for the Act, by translating the technical requirements under other existing pieces of legislation and aligning them with the relevant sections of the Act.  

The new Regulations provide more flexibility to deliver tailor-made solutions for managing specific issues and challenges, enabling faster and more effective management of biosecurity risks now and into the future.

One of the key features of the new Regulations will help protect Tasmania’s beekeeper sector from biological threats such as varroa mite, by making it compulsory for all beekeepers, including recreational beekeepers to be registered. Extensive consultation on compulsory beekeeper registration took place in earlier this year and throughout late 2021. Compulsory beekeeper registration will come into effect before the end of this year and will be free initially. 

Beekeepers are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the conditions of registration before the compulsory registration comes into effect.  Information can be found on the NRE Tasmania website: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/bees/beekeeper-registration​

(2/11/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 42/2022 - General Biosecurity Direction - Livestock Traceability

​​​With the emergence of foot-and-mouth disease and lumpy skin disease in Indonesia, Tasmania’s Chief Veterinary Officer has taken action to protect our livestock sector, issuing a General Biosecurity Direction requiring the owners of sheep and goats to notify the National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) database and in the case of pigs, Pig Pass, of the movements of their animals.

While Australia and Tasmania remain free from foot-and-mouth disease and lumpy skin disease, it is important to have systems and processes in place to reduce the effects of a potential incursion – ensuring authorities are able to quickly trace the movement of livestock is one of these vital measures. 

Traceability helps to track produce through the value chain, from paddock to plate, and has a number of important benefits for biosecurity management, producers and consumers, as well as our trade markets and the Tasmanian brand.

Strong and reliable traceability systems help to uphold Tasmania’s reputation for producing safe, high-quality agricultural products and food and also protect our producers from counterfeiting.

These actions you will help protect Tasmania and the rest of Australia from the introduction and spread of foot-and-mouth Disease and other unwanted pests, weeds, and diseases that would impact Tasmania. We all have a biosecurity duty to help protect Tasmania

Find out more on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: WWW NRET address: https://nre.tas.gov.au/livestock-traceability-direction​

To Register for National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) database: https://www.nlis.com.au/Account/Create​

To Register for pig pass: https://pigpass.australianpork.com.au/PigpassRegistration/RegisterForPigpass

(25/10/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife; Marine pests; Invasive Species;


Biosecurity Advisory 41/2022 - Maintaining Tasmania's Freedom From Fruit Fly - A ​ Strategy for the Future 2022-2027

Maintaining Tasmania’s freedom from fruit fly is a primary focus for Biosecurity Tasmania. Our commitments to help ensure the State’s ongoing freedom are outlined in Tasmania’s fruit fly strategy, which was originally released in 2017. A five-year review of this document has now been completed. Information and action commitments in the Strategy have been revised and updated. 

Updates to the fruit fly strategy include the addition of relatively recent fruit fly prevention initiatives such as mainland-based inspections of high-risk fruit designated for Tasmania, and the Securing Our Borders program that involves intensified inspection of imported fruit on arrival in Tasmania. 

The revised strategy Maintaining Tasmania’s Freedom From Fruit Fly – A Strategy for the Future 2022-2027 can be accessed at https://nre.tas.gov.au/Documents/Fruit%20Fly%20Strategy_2022.pdf




(14/10/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 40/2022 – Changes to Import Requirement 2 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide (amendment to pre-treatment inspection requirement)

​Biosecurity Tasmania has made a minor amendment to Import Requirement 2 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide.

This change is effective from 10 October 2022 and specifies that a pre-treatment inspection is no longer required between 1 April and 30 September each year (per explanatory note for Clause V). This is due to the period not being considered high risk for fruit fly. High risk fruit fly host produce will still require a pre-treatment fruit fly inspection during the period 1 October – 31 March each year.

No other changes have been made to the operation of this Import Requirement.

The updated Import Requirement can be found here: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-plants/plant-and-plant-products-import-requirement-changes

The current High Risk fruit fly host produce list can be found here: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-biosecurity-manual/high-risk-products​​

(10/10/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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