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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get Biosecurity Tasmania Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


286 advisories found.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 1/2022 - Biosecurity Tasmania is calling for volunteers to participate in the "Adopt-a-Trap" survey

Biosecurity Tasmania is calling for volunteers from across the state to host insect traps on their properties during the period January to March 2022.  

This survey aims to re-affirm that Tasmania remains free of a range of exotic plant pests such as tomato potato psyllid (TPP) (Bactericera cockerelli), carrot psyllids (Bactericera trigonica and Trioza apicalis), African citrus psyllid (Trioza erytreae), Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri),  glassy winged sharpshooter (GWSS) (Homalodisca vitripennis) as well as exotic leaf miners (Liriomyza spp) including;  tomato leaf miner (Liriomyza bryoniae), chickpea leaf miner (Liriomyza cicerina), serpentine leaf miner (Liriomyza huidobrensis), vegetable leaf miner (Liriomyza sativae) and American serpentine leaf miner (Liriomyza trifolii).
These pests and diseases are a serious threat to Australia’s potato, tomato, carrot, viticulture, citrus, stone fruit, tree nut and nursery production industries.

While Tasmania is currently free from these pests it is important that we remain vigilant.

The Tasmanian information collected from the survey will be combined with data from other participating states. This will provide ongoing evidence that these pests are not established in Tasmania.

Participants will be provided with a kit and instructions on how to use the traps.
To register or for more information about the survey please visit https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-pest-surveillance/adopt-a-trap-pest-survey

This is an important project to provide evidence of freedom or early detection of exotic pests in Tasmania and your assistance is greatly appreciated.

(20/1/2022)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 37/2021 – Extension of the Animal Health (Apiaries) Regulations 2011 requirements by General Biosecurity Direction (BD: 001/21)

Please be advised that the Animal Health (Apiaries) Regulations 2011 (the Regulations) will expire on 26 December 2021.

Transitional arrangements under the Biosecurity Act 2019, known as a General Biosecurity Direction (BD), have been put in place to extend the current Regulation requirements, pending a new beekeeper registration system.  It is anticipated that the new registration system will be in place by April 2022.

A copy of BD: 001/21 is located here:  https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/bees/general-biosecurity-direction-apiaries 

More information about the new beekeeper registration system, and further stakeholder consultation (including both commercial and recreational beekeepers), on the conditions of registration, will be undertaken in early 2022, before the new registration system commences.

Tasmanian beekeepers are welcome to voluntarily register as a beekeeper with Biosecurity Tasmania at any time, under the current system, using the application form located here:  https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/bees/beekeeper-registration-form 



(22/12/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 36/2021 – Important Update Regarding Calicivirus in Tasmania

​Rabbit management requires an integrated and strategic plan of action using a range of tools and techniques.

The most effective outcomes occur when management efforts look beyond property boundaries and involve a high degree of cooperation between affected landowners, community groups and other stakeholders. Landowners have primary responsibility for managing rabbits on their land.

Calicivirus is used as one option in a suite of available management options to avoid very high rabbit population numbers.

Biosecurity Tasmania (BT) provides advice on rabbit control and regulates the annual release of calicivirus (strain RHDV1-K5). This is because calicivirus is a biological control agent, and its effective use can be more complex than other control options.

BT officers assess properties in response to enquiries from landowners and determine the suitability for release of calicivirus or whether other control options may be more appropriate.

Planning for 2022

As a consequence of the ongoing good growing conditions, 2022 will again be another challenging year for rabbit control.

There is still currently an abundance of food available, especially green grass, so conditions are good for rabbits to breed and they may be less likely to take calicivirus treated bait.  Young rabbits (up to 8 weeks) can develop immunity from calicivirus if infected.  Release of calicivirus in the presence of large number of young rabbits therefore increases the risk of developing immunity within rabbit populations.

BT is continuing to undertake property assessments across the state, however environmental conditions will determine whether release of calicivirus is feasible in 2022.

Publication of release sites 

Calicivirus is typically released (when environmental conditions are suitable) during the March to July period in areas where identified rabbit numbers are problematic.

The release sites from last year (2020) are still available on the Department website.  There was no release of calicivirus in 2021.

If properties are assessed as suitable for calicivirus release in 2022, the areas will be listed on the Department website.  Individual properties are not publicly identified.

What strain of calicivirus is used in Tasmania for rabbit control?

RHDV1-K5 is the only strain released by BT.  RHDV1-K5 is a strain of the original RHDV1 virus, which was first released in Tasmania in 1997.

In 2016, a new variant of calicivirus, RHDV2, was detected in Tasmania.  Previously detected on the mainland, it is not known how RHDV2 arrived in Australia or Tasmania.  RHDV2 is not registered for use as a biological control agent and is NOT released by the Tasmanian Government.

How best to protect domestic rabbits?

Rabbit owners are encouraged to talk with their veterinarian regarding protection against caliciviruses and other rabbit diseases present in the environment, such as myxomatosis. There is currently no approved vaccine available in Australia against RHDV2.

Strategies for protecting pet and farmed rabbits from viruses, including important biosecurity measures, can be found on the Department website.

Where to go for more information?

Rabbit owners and landholders are encouraged to visit the Department website for more information on calicivirus and rabbit management:  https://nre.tas.gov.au/invasive-species/invasive-animals/invasive-mammals/european-rabbits 


(21/12/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife; Plant pests; Plant diseases;


Biosecurity Advisory 35/2021 - Be Biosecurity Safe this Holiday Season

Biosecurity Tasmania wishes everyone a wonderful Christmas and a happy and safe New Year.

To help us all continue to be biosecurity safe, here are some basic biosecurity tips that will help you meet your General Biosecurity Duty to protect Tasmania’s primary industries, environment and state’s enviable way of life from the negative impacts of pests, weeds and diseases.

Disposing of those Christmas ham scraps

Remember that if you have pigs, or provide feed to pig farmers, make sure there are no ham or pork scraps (or anything that has been on a plate with a meat product), in the pig’s feed.

Protect Tasmania from devastating diseases like African swine fever and Foot and Mouth Disease. See more here: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/pigs/swill-feeding 
 
Tasmania is Queensland fruit fly free – please help us keep it that way!

Summer is the peak time for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia and a time of increased risk for Tasmania.

While Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place aimed at reducing the risk of fruit fly getting into Tasmania, we ask everybody to remain vigilant for any signs of the pest.

Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could potentially be found in fruit that you purchased, or from fruit grown in your backyard.

If you see something suspect and are not sure, please report it to Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777. 

See more here: https://nre.tas.gov.au/fruitfly  

Have you prepared a bushfire survival plan for your pets and livestock?

With the summer season now upon us, comes the increased risk of bushfires and Biosecurity Tasmania urges animal owners to be well prepared. 

It is important that everyone with animals has at least a basic plan to protect them during a bushfire. 

For more information on animals and bushfire – and how to plan for survival - check out our website at: https://nre.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-welfare/animals-and-bushfire/animals-and-bushfire-planning  

Travelling to Tasmania?

Are you planning on travelling to Tasmania soon? Please ensure you visit https://www.coronavirus.tas.gov.au/ for the latest information on Tasmanian border entry requirements.

Please also take the time to check all your luggage for restricted items before travelling to Tasmania.

DO NOT BRING fruit and vegetables, seafood and some animal products, plant material, soil and seeds.

If you do accidentally bring something – please DISPOSE of it in the amnesty bin when you arrive, or DECLARE it to one of our biosecurity officers.

You should also ensure that any outdoor or recreational items (i.e. fishing, camping, cycling, bushwalking, hunting, diving, surfing and golf equipment) you bring with you, have been CHECKED, CLEANED and DRIED and are free from soil, dirt, seeds and other foreign matter.

You should be ready to present any recreational or outdoor equipment to Biosecurity Tasmania Officers on arrival for inspection.

For more information on Tasmanian biosecurity see this page: http://nre.tas.gov.au/travellersguide  


(20/12/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Pasture; Plant pests; Seeds; Policy and Legislation; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 34/2021 - Release of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania 2022 Edition

RELEASE OF THE PLANT BIOSECURITY MANUAL TASMANIA 2022 EDITION

Biosecurity Tasmania advises that the 2022 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) is now available.

An updated edition of the PBMTas is released each year to help importers, exporters and the broader public understand the current requirements for the import and export of plants, plant products, and other prescribed matter authorised by the Plant Quarantine Act 1997.

The 2022 edition incorporates changes to import requirements including:

  • Import Requirement 2 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide (removal of specified fruit fly high risk products from the manual, and inclusion of reference to a ‘fruit fly high risk products’ link on Biosecurity Tasmania’s web page)

  • Import Requirement 5 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Hard Green or Similar Condition (minor amendment updating avocado varietal list)

  • Import Requirement 15 – Red Imported Fire Ant – Carriers (major revisions including an IR restructure, and non-acceptance of carrier matter from within 5km of a known infestation)

  • Import Requirement 28 – Blueberry Rust – Hosts and Carriers (major revisions including IR restructure, and fit-for-purpose check with Victoria revoking their State Area Freedom claim)

  • Import Requirement 31 – Hosts and Vectors – Citrus Canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Gabriel et al.) (revoked following Australia being declared free of citrus canker)

  • Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid – Hosts and Carriers (minor amendment to the title)

Some of the above changes occurred, and were advised during 2021, and are now incorporated into the 2022 edition.

Additionally:

  • New pre-entry conditions have been specified for importers wishing to import compost.

  • There are changes to List A pest declarations including the addition of serpentine leaf miner, amendment to Carex albula (New Zealand hair sedge), and revocation of citrus canker.

  • Several species were declared and added to the Unwanted Quarantine Pest list (tomato thrips, tomato spider mite, and tropical red spider mite).

A more comprehensive list of all changes can be found in the section 68 notice at the front of the PBMTas 2022 edition.

A PDF version of the PBMTas 2022 edition can be downloaded here.

(15/12/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports;


Biosecurity Advisory 33/2021 - Community urged to be vigilant for signs of blueberry rust

​Biosecurity Tasmania (BT) is currently investigating a detection of blueberry rust (BBR) on a commercial berry farm in the north of the State.

BT officers will soon be conducting further surveys on the property and a Direction notice has been issued to restrict the movement of fruit and plant material, equipment, staff and visitors.  BT has also commenced the necessary tracing investigations.

This detection is an important reminder of the importance of ongoing blueberry rust vigilance.

Over the coming season please contact BT if you notice any suspect looking blueberries you have picked or purchased, or if you see signs of rust in blueberry plants in your home garden.

Look for signs of brown-rust coloured lesions on the top and yellow-orange pustules on bottom sides of leaves.   Yellow-orange pustules may also appear on the mature fruit.

If you think you may have blueberry rust, please call BT immediately on 03 6165 3777.

Suspect looking fruit should be secured in a zip lock bag, and placed in the refrigerator before calling BT to report the find.

If you do suspect blueberry rust in your plants at home, please do not disturb or move the plants – BT officers will come to you. Care should also be taken to ensure that any clothes or equipment do not become contaminated.

Throughout the berry season all Tasmanians are encouraged to remain vigilant for any signs of plant pests and diseases.

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility, and we all have an important role to play in helping to protect our industries, environment and way-of-life from the impacts of pests, weeds and diseases.

Further information about blueberry rust, including signs and symptoms, is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: www.nre.tas.gov.au/blueberryrust  ​


(8/12/2021)
Categories: Horticulture; Cropping; Plant diseases; Plant pests;


Biosecurity Advisory 32/2021 - Travelling to Tasmania

​If you are travelling to Tasmania, don’t forget to check your bags for any restricted biosecurity material.

In addition to meeting our incoming traveller entry conditions, Tasmania also has strict biosecurity import requirements for items such as fruit and vegetables, seafood, some animal products, plant material, soil, and seeds.

If you do accidentally bring something – please DISPOSE of it in the amnesty bin when you arrive, or DECLARE it to one of our biosecurity officers.

You should also ensure that any outdoor or recreational items (i.e. fishing, camping, cycling, bushwalking, hunting, diving, surfing and golf equipment) you bring with you, have been CHECKED, CLEANED and DRIED and are free from soil, dirt, seeds and other foreign matter.

You should be ready to present any recreational or outdoor equipment to Biosecurity Tasmania Officers on arrival for inspection.

Remember, we all have a General Biosecurity Duty (GBD) to help protect Tasmania from the negative impacts of pests, weeds and diseases.

By checking what you can and can’t bring to Tasmania, and by following Tasmania’s strict biosecurity requirements, you can help meet your GBD.​

For more information on Tasmanian biosecurity see this page: http://nre.tas.gov.au/travellersguide

For more information on Tasmanian border entry requirements visit: https://www.coronavirus.tas.gov.au/​

(3/12/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 31/2021 - Forthcoming changes to Import Requirement 15 - Red Imported Fire Ant carriers

​Biosecurity Tasmania is amending Import Requirement 15 (IR15) of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (the Manual) relating to the import of Red Imported Fire Ant (RIFA) carriers.  This will occur in December 2021 to coincide with the release of the 2022 edition of the Manual.

From mid-December 2021, Biosecurity Tasmania will no longer accept carriers of RIFA that are sourced from properties within 5 km of a known infestation of RIFA.

A carrier means anything, that has or can have RIFA on it, attached to it or contained in it. This includes plants with attached potting media, potting media, organic mulch, soil and turf, hay, straw, agricultural equipment and used containers.

This regulatory change is being initiated after research from CSIRO indicated property level freedom (verified by visual inspection) is no longer adequate to confirm absence of RIFA as a standalone measure.

This amendment follows similar changes made by other jurisdictions regulating for RIFA.

Alternative options for meeting IR15 remain including whole State freedom, certified partial area freedom outside 5 km of a known RIFA infestation, and specific chemical treatment measures for carriers.

A further advisory will be issued regarding release of the 2022 edition of the Manual in December when this amendment takes effect.
For the current (2021) version of the Manual visit: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-biosecurity-manual

(3/11/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports;


Biosecurity Advisory 30/2021 - Tasmania is Queensland fruit fly free – please help us keep it that way!

​Biosecurity Tasmania is asking all Tasmanians to be vigilant for anything unusual in fruit with the spring and summer months being the peak times for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia and a time of increased risk for Tasmania.

While Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place aimed at reducing the risk of fruit fly getting into Tasmania, we ask everybody to remain vigilant for any signs of fruit fly.

Tell-tale signs of fruit fly include live larvae or eggs in the flesh of the fruit or small puncture marks on the skin of the fruit.  Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could potentially be found in fruit that you purchased, or from fruit grown in your backyard.  

Queensland fruit flies lay eggs in a wide range of fruits and fruiting vegetables.  This list is a guide to potential fruit fly hosts.

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility. Biosecurity Tasmania works closely with mainland states to help manage the fruit fly risk and there are increased resources and inspections taking place at the border for imported fruit fly host produce, however the risk to Tasmania can never be zero.  Therefore industry, government and the community are encouraged to remain vigilant and work together to help protect Tasmania.

Anyone who notices any larvae in fruit is asked to put the fruit in a sealed bag or container and place it in the refrigerator and contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777.  Please do not dispose of any fruit that has larvae.

More information on Queensland fruit fly is at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly ​

(4/10/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 29/2021 - Update on Potato Commodity Import Risk Analysis

​Biosecurity Tasmania initiated an Import Risk Analysis (IRA) for potatoes in October 2020, and significant components of the analysis are now complete.

Completed work includes the determination of eight pathways through which potato pests might enter Tasmania together with host (potato) and potato industry profiling. In addition, most of the pest categorisation data (including for fungi, bacteria, nematodes, phytoplasmas, viruses and viroids, and insects) has been completed, along with six targeted industry consultation sessions.

The IRA has assessed 413 pests worldwide, of which 408 are considered to have a legitimate association with the host (potato). Of the 408 legitimate species, 203 are known to be present in Australia.  Of the 203, a total of 85 are absent from Tasmania.

Of the pests present in Australia, these are being assessed to determine which species will need to attract regulatory attention once this work is completed.  Some will be
declared as Unwanted Quarantine Pests - meaning they are not permitted entry into Tasmania. Others will require full pest risk analysis to determine if they are to be considered Regulated Quarantine Pests (RQPs) - formally regulated in trade via Import Requirements (IRs).  Full pest risk analysis includes production of supporting pest data sheets. The data sheets underpin estimation of likelihoods of entry, establishment, spread and potential consequences in Tasmania.

Further work also includes revision of the relevant Import Requirement (IR), and industry and public consultation on the IRA before it is finalised.

It is estimated that the IRA will be available for public consultation by the end of 2021.

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(30/9/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;

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